twitter

The Dangers of Social Isolation for Elders

Jul 06,2015

The Dangers of Social Isolation for Elders

As children grow older and leave the home, as retirement takes away much of the interaction with work contacts, and as the possible loss of a spouse impacts an elderly individual, being alone becomes the norm. Unfortunately, it can also be a dangerous problem if you don’t plan ahead for how you can stay socially involved with friends, family, and your community. shutterstock_152237090

As baby boomers age, it becomes much more likely that both parents and even friends pass away, which can lead to feelings of extremely loneliness and even depression. When these major life events alter how often you’re interacting with others, it’s important to take steps to build a support structure. For many, this means getting involved in community organizations like a church.

There are many benefits to regular social interaction, including better self-confidence, happiness, and an improved overall outlook on life. Other family members can be a critical part of the support structure you build, but it can be very beneficial to establish regular habits with community organizations. Whether it’s getting together for fellowship or volunteering in some capacity, it can be very advantageous to find other friends and peers to network with. Building a routine that involves regular interaction with these kinds of groups can also help to combat loneliness.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

The law firm of Shah & Associates, P.C. © 2018 All Rights Reserved.

MENU